Uncategorized

Get e-book Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences book. Happy reading Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Co-Morbidities and Systemic Consequences Pocket Guide.

Hilty, C. Burke, H. Pedro, P. Cardenas, A.


  • Living in the End Times!
  • Battlesystem: Miniatures Rules (Advanced Dungeons & Dragons).
  • Anxiety and depression—Important psychological comorbidities of COPD!
  • Lockheed P-38 Lightning cz.3.
  • Subscribe to our newsletter?

Bush, C. Bossley, et al. Disordered microbial communities in asthmatic airways. Erb-Downward, D. Thompson, M. Han, C. Freeman, L. McCloskey, L. Schmidt, et al. Sze, P. Dimitriu, M. Suzuki, J. McDonough, J. Campbell, J. Brothers, et al. Moghaddam, C. Clement, M. De la Garza, X. Zou, E. Travis, H. Young, et al. Haemophilus influenzae lysate induces aspects of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotype.

Bacteria and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. King, S.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in Women - UCLAMDCHAT

Lim, A. Pick, J. Ngui, Z. Prodanovic, W. Downey, et al. Lung T-cell responses to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. J Allergy Clin Immunol. Thomsen, T. Ingebrigtsen, J. Marott, M. Dahl, P. Lange, J. Vestbo, et al. Inflammatory biomarkers and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chancafe Morgan, R.

Jimenez Garcia. The association between COPD and heart failure risk: a review. S Medline. Ghoorah, A. De Soyza, V. Increased cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the potential mechanisms linking the two conditions: a review. Cardiol Rev. Duvoix, J. Dickens, I. Haq, D. Mannino, B. Miller, R. Tal-Singer, et al. Blood fibrinogen as a biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Mannino, E. Ford, S. Obstructive and restrictive lung disease and markers of inflammation: data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination. Kessler, M. Partridge, M. Miravitlles, M. Cazzola, C.

Comorbidities and Burden of COPD: A Population Based Case-Control Study

Vogelmeier, D. Leynaud, et al. Cazzola, P. Rogliani, M. Lancet Respir Med. Javier de. Beta-blockers in patients with chronic obstructive disease and coexistent cardiac illnesses. Brekke, T. Omland, S. Holmedal, P. Smith, V. Troponin T elevation and long-term mortality after chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Baillard, M. Boussarsar, J. Fosse, E. Girou, P. Le Toumelin, C.

Comorbidities and systemic effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Cracco, et al. Cardiac troponin I in patients with severe exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Intensive Care Med. Beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptor polymorphisms and cardiovascular diseases. Fundam Clin Pharmacol. Med Clin North Am. Campo, R. Pavasini, S. Biscaglia, M. Contoli, C. Overview of the pharmacological challenges facing physicians in the management of patients with concomitant cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother. Wang, J. Li, Z. Cao, Y. Mean platelet volume is decreased during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Harrison, P. Short, P. Williamson, A. Singanayagam, J. Chalmers, S. Thrombocytosis is associated with increased short and long term mortality after exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a role for antiplatelet therapy?.

Pavasini, A. Pollina, M. Tebaldi, R. On-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Howard, A. Lahousse, M. Vernooij, S. Darweesh, S. Akoudad, D. Loth, G. Joos, et al. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebral microbleeds. The Rotterdam Study. Huang, J. Luo, H. Leu, H. Lin, F. Lee, W. Chan, et al. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an independent risk factor for peptic ulcer bleeding: a nationwide population-based study.


  1. You are here.
  2. The Future of Educational Research: Perspectives from Beginning Researchers.
  3. Background/Aims.
  4. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. Huang, Y. Yang, J. Zhu, Y. Liang, H. Zhang, L. Tian, et al. Clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atrial fibrillation: results from a multicenter atrial fibrillation registry study. J Am Med Dir Assoc. Goodman, D. Wojdyla, J. Piccini, H. White, J. Paolini, C.

    Customer Reviews

    Nessel, et al. Factors associated with major bleeding events: insights from the ROCKET AF trial rivaroxaban once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation. J Am Coll Cardiol. Petersen, A. Sood, P. Meek, X. Shen, Y. Cheng, S. Belinsky, et al. Rapid lung function decline in smokers is a risk factor for COPD and is attenuated by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use.

    Lopez-Campos, E. Marquez-Martin, C. Beta-blockers and COPD: the show must go on. Baker, R. Markwardt, G. McAvay, C. Gross, L. Goeres, L. Han, et al. Effect of beta-blockers on cardiac and pulmonary events and death in older adults with cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Med Care. Celli, M. Decramer, S. Kesten, D. Liu, S. Mehra, D. Wise, A. Anzueto, D. Cotton, R. Dahl, T. Devins, B. Disse, et al. Gershon, R. Croxford, A. Calzavara, T. To, M. Stanbrook, R. Upshur, et al. Cardiovascular safety of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Ferreira, A. Reis, N. Marcal, P. Pinto, C. COPD: A stepwise or a hit hard approach?. Ferreira, M. Drummond, N. Pires, G. Reis, C. Alves, C. Xia, H. Wang, X. Calverley, J. Anderson, B. Celli, G. Ferguson, C. Jenkins, P. Jones, et al. Rodrigo, V. Efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of indacaterol and Glycopyrronium for the treatment of COPD: a systematic review. Van de Maele, L. Fabbri, C.

    Comorbidities and systemic effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Martin, R. Horton, M. Dolker, T. Wedzicha, R. Dahl, R. Buhl, A. History of other symptoms orthopnea, chest pain, fever, heamptosis, wheezes, palpation, epigastric pain, cyanosis, anorexia, loss of weight, muscle and bone pain. History of exacerbation, previous hospitalization and ICU admission and classification of exacerbation severity according to the intensity of the medical intervention required to control the patient's symptoms Severe patients require hospitalization or visit emergency room may be also associated with acute respiratory failure. It consists of 50 items divided into three domains: Symptoms, Activity and Impacts.

    A score is calculated for each domain and a total score, including all items, is also calculated. Low scores indicate a better quality of life. General examination pulse, Blood pressure, temperature, respirtratory rate, JVP, lower limb edema, lymph node. Laboratory investigations:- complete blood count white blood cells ,red blood cells, hemoglobin, haematocrite and platelets , liver function tests alanine aminotransferase ALT , aspartate aminotransferase AST and serum albumin , renal function tests serum creatinine , urea , blood sugar, prothrombin time and concentration and serum electrolytes potassium, sodium and calcium.

    Description of qualitative variables as number and percentage. In our study COPD patients 74 males and 36 females , with mean age There was significant difference in age and sex between different phenotypes. The frequent exacerbator and ACOS were older than other phenotypes.

    There was significance difference in smoking status between COPD phenotypes. Current smokers were prevalent in Chronic bronchitis phenotype as shown in Table 1. The lowest parameters were recorded in frequent exacerbator followed by COPD with Bronchiectasis phenotypes as shown in Table 2. There was significance difference in all items of St. Activity score, impact and total scores were highest in Frequent exacerbator then COPD with bronchiectasis as shown in Table 3. As shown in Figure 1 , Figure 2.

    Figure 1. Figure 2. The most common co-morbidities in all studied subjects was gastritis Figure 3. Co morbidities of all studied cases. More cases developed exacerbation in the last years, sever form of excerbation and ICU admission was related to frequent exacerbator phenotype with significant difference between phenotypes as regards one or two previous hospitalization and sever excerbation as shown in Table 4.

    As regards evaluation of co-morbidities in different COPD phenotypes, there was significance difference in IHD ischemic heart disease it was more present in Emphysema Also there was significance difference in Cor-pulmonale, founded more in Frequent exacerbator There was significance difference in Osteoporosis co-morbidity, presented more in Emphysema There was significance difference in depression co-morbidity, it was more in Frequent exacerbator There was no significance difference in Arrhythmia, Pulmonary HTN, systemic hypertension, Obesity hypoventilation syndrome, Liver disease, Renal disease, pulmonary co-morbidities Pneumonia, Pleural effusion, Pneumothorax, Pulmonary embolism, Lung cancer , Polythesthemia, Anxiety, Stroke and gastritis co-morbidities between phenotypes as shown in Table 5.

    As regards discharge from hospital with domcilliary oxygen was more in frequent excerbator phenotype and four cases died in emphysema phenotypes denoting the more severe form of phenotypes and more responsive phenotypes related to ACOS and chronic bronchitis as shown in Table 6. COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world; many people suffer from this disease for years, and die prematurely from it or its complications. Several phenotypes have already been proposed but the understanding of which attributes define which groups of patient's remains challenges.

    Also there was significance difference in smoking status between different COPD phenotypes. The most common co-morbidity present in our studied cases was gastritis followed by cor-pulmonale and hypertension and this is inconsistent with Gianna et al. In our study there was no significance difference in number of ICU admission between phenotype, this was agreed with Beeh, Glaab et al. Rent the eBook. FAQ Policy. Show all. Cardiovascular Disease Pages Troosters, Thierry. Cognitive Function Pages Meek, Paula.

    Inactivity Pages Garcia-Aymerich, Judith. Show next xx. Recommended for you.